In honor of the big release of Commander’s Arsenal tomorrow, I decided to put together a little exercise to show you where Commander’s Arsenal would go next, given the right confluence of events.  These events, in order, would list as follows:
  1. GeneralDamageControl.com decides to ride the massive wave of popularity it is enjoying and issues an IPO. 
  2. Said IPO is a massive hit, and initial returns show GDCO stocks trading at roughly $91/share. 
  3. GDC decides to do the “responsible thing” (in an extremely loose sense of the word) and reinvest in the Magic community. 
So it buys Hasbro.
  1. I appoint myself the new CEO, and my first action in office is to abolish the Magic: The Gathering Reprint Policy
  2. My second action is to kick everyone out of R&D at Wizards of the Coast, lock the doors, and create the follow-up to the vastly-successful and not-at-all-maligned-by-the-community-at-large original Commander’s Arsenal.
Here’s what happens next-
Since I’m taking this product back to the EDH community, I want to make sure that I get in as many lands as I can.  Lands have the broadest potential appeal (arguably next to artifacts), and I want to offer up an option that helps to allow players to play multi-color decks easier. 
Since this has seen print a few times already, I’ll clearly be commissioning John Avon to come up with a new alternate art for it. 
It looks like my Dear Azami co-writer over at StarCityGames.com has managed to somehow buy a majority share in GDC.  Sean McKeown immediately threatens a ‘Vote Of No Confidence’ if I don’t slide this one in, and I’m more than happy to oblige him. 
My mantra of ‘always playing all the time’ fits perfectly with Winding Canyons.  It’s an EDH staple for good reason, and I won’t lie…I need a foil copy for my Riku deck.
Since John Avon is chained to a chair already here, he can give this one a solid treatment as well.
This is going to be the new hotness for the format.  Foil copies are selling for $5.99 on StarCity already, and I suspect that price is being driven primarily by EDH. 
Utility lands with no color identity will always see solid consideration, and this one has the potential to break open games and make general damage strategies far stronger.  Prepare to see this one a lot in the future.
I’ll probably let John go after reworking the art on this one.  I’m a kind and benevolent CEO, after all.
This is the definitive mana rock for the format, and while it’s not particularly hard to get access to, I’d like to see a nice new foil treatment added to the card pool. 
It’s polarizing, but I love Volkan Baga’s 2008 Pro Tour (and now Commander’s Arsenal) treatment for Mirari’s Wake, so I’ll let him out of the dungeon politely ask him to rework Ingot.
The hallmark of the format appeared in the Commander Precons, but the masses need foil versions.  (And by masses, I mean me.) 
This one breaks from the mold.  It’s getting printed for this set in the old-school pre-Modern frame using the Alpha layout and coloring.  And no set symbol either.
The original art is nice, but it sure doesn’t look all that fast to me.  It’s a giant pile of sculpted metal…who’s running in these things? 
The FNM promo art looks like a high-fashion take on a pair of riding boots.  That’s no good either.
Daniel Ljunggren has got a great feel for artwork focused on artifacts.  In particular, Darksteel Plate and Grafdigger’s Cage stand out, and I think he’d knock Greaves out of the park.
While we’re here, let’s round out the foil job on the legendary creatures from the Precons that should have been in Commander’s Arsenal instead of the oversize foils.
And while we’re at it, I want to get in a few other blasts from the past that should be represented in foil and more readily available, as both are solid (and well-liked) general options and neither are particularly easy to come by.
I know, I know…cross-format appeal.  The fact of the matter is that Sneak Attack is quite possibly one of the best examples of flavor-driven card designs out there, and it absolutely rings with EDH appeal.  I’m positive this card would see a ton of play if it weren’t so expensive and hard to come by, so this is an easy red include for me.
Dedicated white decks are handicapped primarily by the lack of solid card draw, but most of the time they’re also forced to go into artifact acceleration due to a lack of good on-color options in that area as well.  This aims to fix that problem with one of the best land tutors ever to be printed. 
Unfortunately, ‘iconic’ doesn’t always mean ‘good’ as far as art goes, so Brian Snoddy’s Legends piece is out.  And while I like the Judge Foil art style, it’s not really all that relevant and a little strange.  I want something thematically along the lines of Black Market, but probably done by Jim Nelson, who did the Judge Foil Thawing Glaciers artwork.
Along the same lines as Sol Ring, there need to be more foil copies available for this format staple.  The Fifth Dawn versions are expensive, and while I like Terese Nielsen’s art for the most part, the FNM Promo version is a step in the wrong direction.
This one is getting handed off to my favorite figure artist in the history of the game – Richard Kane-Fergusen.
This runs the same cross-format risk that Sneak Attack does, but again, I think this is another card that is flavorful and fun, fits the color well, and should embody a large part of what EDH is all about and see solid play…if there were more floating around at reasonable prices.
Neither current pieces of artwork do it for me.  I’m handing this one off to Zoltan Boros & Gabor Szikszai to give it the Avenger of Zendikar treatment.
Sol Ring rules apply.  Doug Schuler Alpha art and colors, old-school border, no set symbol. 
Back to the people again!  I know there’s a risk of this showing up in the Modern set next summer, but this is a card that needs to be in the format.  People want this card, and plain versions are running around $30 a pop.  If you want the awesome Kev Walker art in foil instead of the not-so-awesome Ron Spencer Player Rewards art, you’re dropping closer to $50. 
Not on my watch.
You think people flipped out initially over Loyal Retainers?  That those people calling for Mana Drain in Commander’s Arsenal were nuts? 
There’s a new sheriff in town.
Seriously…this is a perfect opportunity to get people who wouldn’t otherwise have the opportunity the chance to get in on a piece of Magic history.  Let’s face it…Timetwister is really teetering on the verge of falling off the ‘Power 9’ list to begin with, and the effect is not nearly as broken as it once was considered to be.  In fact, Time Spiral might still be better, even though it can’t be recurred like ‘Twister can. 
I think this is the kind of splashy old-school card that would have a perfect home in EDH.
There it is, folks.  Commander’s Arsenal 2.  Coming soon to game and hobby stores, major department store chains, and any other place that sells Magic cards these days.  Look for a widespread release and an MSRP of $34.99.
àCass

àCEO, GDC.Com, Hasbro