seanblacksheep

“Ugh, Arcum? OK Fine. Every body kill him first.” Ever heard something like that?

I’ve been working on this project on and off for over a years now, all thanks to an email I received in early May of 2015, requesting an article about Commanders that have bad reputations, how those generals earned the rap, whether it is deserved, how to fight against these commanders, and ideas to play differently using them to improve their reputation.

Today, we’re updating the Azorius section.

This is a massive but interesting project, so I’m breaking it up into pieces. For starters, I’ve put together a list of what I consider the generals with a bad reputation, organized below by color/color group. Roughly every other night until it’s done or I fall to pieces, we’ll update the list below with some of the answers to the questions raised above, to turn this into an indexed resource for the Commander community.

First, I’d like you to go to the comments or Tweet at me @SwordstoPlow answering any of these three questions:

  1. Who is missing and why?
  2. Which Commanders to you agree or disagree with, and why?
  3. How would you use one or more in an innovative or fun way to counteract their bad reputation?

Now, without any more delays…

Commanders with Bad Reputations

Table of Contents

NEW
Bruna, Light of Alabaster
Grand Arbiter Augustin IV
Hanna, Ship’s Navigator

Previous Updates
Animar, Soul of Elements
Child of Alara
Derevi, Empyrial Tactician
Ghave, Guru of Spores
Kaalia of the Vast
Karador, Ghost Chieftain
Maelstrom Wanderer
Marchessa, the Black Rose
The Mimeoplasm
Narset, Enlightened Master
Nekusar, the Mindrazer
Nicol Bolas
Numot, the Devastator
Oloro, Ageless Ascetic
Prossh, Skyraider of Kher
Rafiq of the Many
Riku of Two Reflections
Scion of the Ur-Dragon
Sharuum of Two Reflections
Uril, the Miststalker
Zur the Enchanter

Five Color

Scion of the Ur-Dragon

Scion isn’t really a problem. The problem is that he has become the poster child for Hermit Druid Commander decks. Hermit Druid decks run zero non-basic lands so they can flip the entire deck, and then use Narcomeba, Hermit Druid, and any card that resurrects itself for free or cheap to fuel a Dread Return based combo. The most common target for Dread Return is currently Necrotic Ooze. Since the whole library is in the graveyard he can have any number of game winning abilities such as Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker and Mogg Fanatic to burn the table to the ground. This deck runs an abundance of cheap tutors such as Vampiric tutor, Demonic Tutor, Survival of the Fittest, and Worldly Tutor to get druid as quickly and consistently as possible. The final piece of the deck is a gigantic control plan to keep itself alive and protect the combo.

This is honestly an incredibly difficult build to deal with, because the combo requires such little commitment, making it easy to run enough control to deal with the answers that come up. The best thing for this is graveyard hate. Having Leyline of the Void or Rest in Peace on board can make all the difference. Otherwise, countering the druid or using Ravenous Trap in response to the Dread Return is key. If all else fails, you can force the Scion player to draw a card in response to the Return, because they have effectively decked themselves.

Scion isn’t bad on his own. If you play it as a five-color ‘good-stuff’ deck or a dragon tribal, you will be fine. Just don’t play Hermit Druid without a decent number of basic lands and you can start to repair the Ur’s reputation.

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Sliver Queen

Child of Alara

Child gets a bad reputation for being the go-to leader of Wrath of God.dec. Having the board get completely wrecked every turn can make games last forever and a day. It’s just frustrating for a table to never have the ability to set up.

This is a deck that really needs it’s Commander, and needs the commander to go to the graveyard. Having Leyline of the Void or Rest in Peace will force the player to resort to the regular wraths in the deck. The absolute best way to deal with this is to have someone steal Child and then cast Darksteel Mutation on the bad baby. The best Counterspells for this are Spelljack and Gather Specimens

I’m honestly at a loss for how you could possibly improve the reputation of this card. It does what it does, and that can be frustrating.

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Naya

Uril, the Miststalker

Big, hexproof commanders are very difficult to deal with. When they changed the legend rule, people were clamoring for the banning of this beast. With the ban of tuck he has become even more difficult to control. Every set seems to improve Uril, one of the most prolific boogeymen in Commander. All of the various Enchantresses and powerful auras quickly make him a two-to-three turn commander-damage clock who you will have a heck of a time killing. Thanks to Totem Armor, wraths are usually pretty ineffective as well.

Arcane Lighthouse and Archetype of Endurance will allow you to use some regular removal on him. If you combine one of those with a Control Magic you could put the Uril player in a position s/he is not prepared for. If you don’t have access to those, mass enchantment removal and hate is a good path to take. Fracturing Gust, Austere Command[card], [card]Back to Nature[card], [card]All is Dust, Bane of Progress, ect, ect.

Aside from not hitting people with Uril, he’s another commander who just is what he is. Avoiding the Armageddon and Jokulhops style of play is a good idea to improve his reputation. Otherwise, you can try playing him on a budget with more of the fun enchantments or not building so much around him as the center.

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Bant

Rafiq of the Many

Rafiq falls into the same category as Uril, Jor Kadeen, the Prevailer, Godo, Bandit Warlord, andThe Mimeoplasm – commanders that can realistically get to the point where they kill a player each turn. Rafiq’s bad reputation comes from abruptly ending games. Grafted Exoskeleton turns him, or any creature with a base power of three or more into a one shot killing machine. He’s also the poster boy for being equipped with Swords of X and Y (like Sword of Feast and Famine). He has double strike, and Finest Hour can give him quadruple strike, for all the value in the world.

Fogs and spot removal are the way to go if Rafiq is a problem in your area. He’s a straight-forward aggro kinda guy, so straight-forward control can usually take care of him.

Rafiq doesn’t have to be a bad man. Putting him at the helm of a soldier-themed deck, and Exalted deck, or just not playing Umazawe’s Jitte and Grafted Exoskelton could go a long way in removing his bad reputation.

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Derevi, Empyrial Tactician

Derevi is a card who recently upped her (?) bad reputation. Without tuck, this value monster will never go away. At a converted mana cost of four for the entire game, she can make players feel hopeless. The biggest issue right now is that playing Derevi will look like you are trying to take unfair advantage of the rules change (assuming your group has decided to follow the rules change).

Essentially your best and only option to combat Derevi is to have a way to steal her. I suggest memorizing the Avarice Totem stack order if you don’t play blue or green (hi Willow Satyr).

If you are playing a casual Derevi deck, I suspect that the reputation will just improve over time. She currently make this list mostly out of bitterness over the rules change, and maybe her tendency to lead a staxy “unfun” deck.

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Grixis

Marchessa, the Black Rose

Marchesa is a bit of a new add onto the bad-red list. Essentially, she is just an upgraded Shirei, Shizo’s Caretaker deck. The hatred comes from frustration of never being able to really kill anything on her board permanently. I am not sure how long she will maintain a bad rep, but she is a powerful commander that when built around is effective.
Graveyard hate is one of the easiest ways to deal with Marchesa. If you exile a graveyard, those cards just aren’t coming back. If you don’t have much graveyard hate, using exile, theft, and tuck removal spells shut her down as well.
Since there is no set way to build or break Marchesa, I think her reputation will fade in time. I’d continue to play her and just try and have a good time. Time will do the rest.

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Nekusar, the Mindrazer

Like many other cards on the list, Nekusar has the unfortunate fate of being too niche. Nekusar decks will all naturally look very similar to each other. You see a lot of Spiteful Visions, Wheel of Fortunes, and Teferi’s Puzzle Boxes floating around. The deck also interacts on a different axis – It kills people without attacking. This leads to less interactive games, and that can leave a bad taste in player’s mouths.
Nekusar is fairly easy to deal with. Removal and life gain can both greatly mitigate the effects of the deck. It’s easier for non-red and black decks to deal with the threats because they include many enchantments.
My biggest recommendation to Nekusar players is to make sure it isn’t your only deck. It’s a consistent deck that follows a solid strategy, but opponents will get bored with it quickly.

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Nicol Bolas

Nicol Bolas is mean, plain and simple. Very few players enjoy losing their hand from a single hit. It doesn’t really matter what is in the rest of the deck, because the thought of being pummeled and losing all of your cards is enough to fuel a bad reputation.
Killing Nicol Bolas before he can swing is easily the best way to deal with this commander. Library of Leng can combat the effects. Having a commander that reanimates is a way to punish a player for making you discard, and a strategy I highly recommend.
There is not really anything that can be done to improve the reputation of one of the bad-boys of the Magic the Gathering. He’s an evil elder dragon and he’s poised to stay that way for a long time.

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Jund

Prossh, Skyraider of Kher

Food Chain and Purphoros are the primary reason that people seem to hate seeing Prossh giving them the stink eye from across a table. Essentially any commander with an attached infinite combo (or more than one attached combo) isn’t going to have the best reputation. The way this works is pretty simple; you sacrifice all the kobold tokens for mana and use some of that mana to recast Prossh. You get infinite mana for creatures and infinite enters-the-battlefield triggers.
Artifact and Enchantment instant speed exile/tuck removal is the single best way to shut down these combos and have a good game. Deglamer, Chaos Warp, and Dissipate are all examples of great choices that can save your bacon.
Prossh could easily have a better reputation if people would just avoid the combos. It is a hard temptation to resist, however, and I don’t expect to see a flood of ‘friendly’ Prossh decks anytime soon.

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Mardu

Kaalia of the Vast

There are many reasons to dislike Kaalia, from sneaking in Iona, Shield of Emeria to hitting you with Master of Cruelties. All the reasons to dislike Kaalia are brutal, effective, and most of all – played out. We’ve all seen dozens of Kaalia decks doing these things and they all essentially look the same.
Kaalia can be handled by killing her about three or four times so that it’s better to just cast the fatties rather than sneak them in. Watch out for the Armageddon Kaalia build and keep mana and spot removal ready so that they don’t have a perfect opening to blow everyone out. If you want to be really effective, try Humility against this deck. It will teach people about Humility on multiple levels.
I guess you could make Kaalia a secondary consideration or just use basic utility angels, dragons, and demons, but it would take a long time to recover from the reputation she has built.

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Temur

Animar, Soul of Elements

An author on Star City Games once called for the banning of Animar. He compared the advantage that Animar gave to the level of Emrakul, The Aeons Torn. While I don’t exactly agree with that, Animar Is undoubtedly a powerhouse if left unchecked. It has built in protection, mana ramp, and combos out with Palinchron. The main reason for hating Animar comes from the speed of the deck.; Animar comes out early and drops some major threats before people are prepared to deal with them.
My biggest recommendation is to steal Animar. Its level of ramp is relevant throughout a game, so simply killing him doesn’t usually slow down the deck much. If it’s a poorly built Animar deck, some spot removal may work, just to keep them off high levels of mana.
Animar is a value beast, so the best thing you can do to improve its reputation is to play a casual theme. Animar will support/help most themes so have fun and try something a little more out there.

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Maelstrom Wanderer

As you will notice, there is a common theme for RUG legends being hated – value. Maelstrom Wanderer gets the hate it deserves from the basic advantage you get by getting three cards each time you cast it. It is big enough to be a threat on the table, but opponents don’t want to see it get recast either. Extra turn spells and the Mirage-style tutors like Mystical Tutor and Brutalizer Exarch make the cascades consistent and powerful. (You see these decks using a lot of extra turn spells.)

Wanderer takes a very specific strategy to stop. You have to destroy lands and regulate mana. This is essentially the pinnacle of a ramp deck, where just having a ton of mana is too much of a threat to ignore. Winter Orb and Armageddon effects should be considered if someone in your group is choosing to play Wanderer.
Maelstrom Wanderer is good, but really only as good as the cards in the rest of the deck since that are where most of the value comes from. If you build it with the intent to be casual, you will improve the reputation overtime.

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Riku of Two Reflections

Riku gets his bad reputation entirely from being a combo engine. He goes infinite with both Palinchron and Worldgorger Dragon. Then people use him to take a bunch of extra turns and get double Regrowth to make sure the turns never end. Commanders who are including in multiple infinite combo engines will always bring in a fair degree of hate from the anti-combo crowd.

Riku has a little body and no build in protection, so hating him out is as simple as playing removal. His combos are all fairly mana intensive so early on he should be easy to slow down. Later in the game it can get tricker to deal with the deck since it doesn’t need to wait a turn to go off. Make sure to keep an eye out for things that cheat cards into play like Flash and Sneak Attack, as they cut the mana needed for combos down drastically. Without tuck as an option, I’d say stealing him away should be the preferred option.

Riku has become less and less hated over time due to working so well with heavily themed decks. Playing Riku beasts, Riku Allies, or Riku all-spells will clear him of his bad reputation in short order.

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Esper

Sharuum the Hegemon

Sharuum, also known as the winner of the GDC March Madness Tournament from a few years, has a well-deserved reputation. The problem starts with the various infinite combos that Sharuum is a part of. She Mindslaver locks and she creates gravestorm with both Sculpting Steel and Phyrexian Metamorph. Sharuum is also a great reanimator and takes full advantage of Lion’s Eye Diamond. The true hate however, comes from how hard it is to stop this deck. It has tutors for anything it needs in any color it can cast. It has access to the best removal in the game. It has the best card draw options available. The ramp technically isn’t as stable overall as green decks, but it is in the right position to play both Winter Orb and Armageddon style spells.

The best way to fight a Sharuum deck is to simply win first. You can play artifact hate, but the removal suite and recursion make it hard to really feel the sting. Gaddock Teeg is a pretty good option against it as well. However, trying to answer Sharuum is an uphill battle for anything but the most dedicated control decks. For most players, you band together and take out this archenemy.

I’m not really sure what you can do to improve the reputation of this deck. You can avoid combos and Armageddon, but it will always be powerful with the Sphinx at the helm. Any ideas on how to make this commander more friendly are welcome.

Zur the Enchanter

One of my two least-favorite generals in Commander, Zur is the hands-down shining beacon of evil. He leads all who follow his example down a trail of shattered smiles and lost time. He can tutor up Stasis and casts Armageddon like Chandra casts Lightning Bolt. The deck doesn’t need much room to progress its plans of either Power Artifact mana madness or lock-you-down-and-beat-you-up with Empyrial Armor paired with Necropotence.

The way to beat Zur is to never let him swing – ever. Kill or Arrest Zur, and then knock down whatever player made the poor life choice of playing him to begin with.

If you want to improve Zur’s reputation, I recommend locking him in a box and then feeding the key to a sloth. (Small key, don’t hurt the cute sloth). By the time it makes its way through the sloth’s system, he’ll still be hated, but you can relate to dealing with shit and should be smart enough not to play him.

Oloro, Ageless Ascetic

Have you ever tried beating someone to death with a whiffle bat? That is what playing against Oloro is like. The deck runs off of what feels like an endless stream of synergies throughout the ages of magic. This is the “rope-a-dope” of deck strategies. It lets you swing at in throughout the game, not even really trying to block. It just keeps brushing off blows until it is set up to drop a combo with counter backup – the most popular finisher being the combination of Sanguine Blood+Exquisite Blood. However, there are a lot of other options, including Debt to the Debtless, Exanguinate, Felidar Sovereign, and combining Wound Reflection with either Sorin Markov or Magister Sphinx.

Beating any Esper deck can be a little tough due to the combination of tutors and the access to answers. However, two strategies that counter Oloro nicely are commander damage and Infect. If Oloro can’t heal from it, it has to actually acknowledge the damage it is taking. This means spending resources it could have used to protect or tutor up combo pieces. The other option is to turn the deck against itself. A Magister Sphinx can be crippling to an Oloro deck, so packing a Bribery, Acquire, or even Praetor’s Grasp can knock out one of these players in short order.

Oloro is right on the line of being on this list or not quite worth the nod. If you want to play an Oloro deck and improve the reputation, just removing the combos – and maybe Serra Ascendant – would be enough to remove it from the list.

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Abzan

Ghave, Guru of Spores

Ghave has the problem of having too much of a good thing. Ghave really has too many synergies with other cards. It feels like no matter what card get laid down, Ghave can abuse it. He can gain any amount of life with both Deathgreeter and Soul Warden effects. He can force you to sacrifice all your creatures with Grave Pact. If you are attached to non-creature permanents, he’s got the fallback of Aura Shards. He can grow to infinite size with cards like Doubling Season, Cathars’ Crusade, or Blade of the Bloodchief. There are infinite mana and trigger loops with either Earthcraft+ Mana Reflection or Ashnod’s Altar+Nim Deathmantle. The list keeps going on, and the deck essentially builds itself. The combination of redundancy homogeneity makes this deck feel inevitable and altogether boring.

Fighting Ghave is really tough. As long as it has access to abundant mana, it can answer cards like Rest in Peace and Leyline of the Void that would usually shut it down. The two primary ways of stopping Ghave are stealing him (as long as the Ghave player is tapped out and has no sacrifice outlet) and destroying all the mana. Mana denial through Winter Orb or the dreaded Armageddon is the best hope of knocking Ghave out. Sadly, mana denial of any kind is usually frowned upon; this means that most of the time the answer to Ghave is waiting for the current pilot to get bored of the deck.

Outside of playing an ultra-themed fungus deck, I don’t really see Ghave’s reputation improving. Wizards isn’t about to stop printing cards that interact with creatures coming into play, leaving play, being sacrificed, or having counters put on them. As time goes on, Ghave decks will only get better and the reputations will only get worse.

Karador, Ghost Chieftain

Let’s have a little talk about Stax. Stax is a strategy that is also commonly referred to as a ‘prison’ deck. The decks play cards like Smokestack and Tangle Wire, while being setup to play a large number of permanents to minimize the “balanced” effects. Karador plays creatures that either have great effects when they enter the battlefield – like Duplicant orAcidic Slime – or you want to sacrifice them, like Kokoshu, the Evening Star or Academy Rector. Karador keeps the loops going by having a lot of creatures beyond Karador that also recur permanents. A common loop would be;

Karador is actually pretty easy to disrupt. The problem with stax decks is that they require both the constant generation of permanents and their prison cards to effectively operate. Destroying either will stop the deck. Removal that exiles slaps down any plans the deck may have.

Stax itself is something that belongs on the list and that is the real reason Karador is here – to be used as an example. There is nothing that forces players to use this strategy, and Karador is a pretty open Commander to build. If players leave the prison elements out of the deck, it will have a better reputation over time.

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Jeskai

Narset, Enlightened Master

 You know how every Commander group loves to watch one person play solitaire with their deck while they wait on the edge of their seats waiting to be told when they are dead?  Your group doesn’t like that?  Maybe that’s because it’s an awful experienced that should be reserved for whatever level of hell you go to for crop dusting the children’s toys in Walmart. (You know who you are).  Narset loves to take extra turns, then extra combat steps, and then some more extra turns.  For some reason, players hate Commanders that take four-plus turns every time they take one.

Dealing with Narset is a pain, no getting around it.  Hexproof is an annoying thing to keep stapling to legends that were already good enough without it. Scratch that – hexproof is just annoying, period.  I preferred it when it was “Troll Shroud” and the only legend we had to worry about was that stinky yeti Uril, The Miststalker.  I miss shroud, and having cards that had both an upside and downside.  Sadly, the way you deal with Narset is through counters, forced sacrifice, and board wipes. Declaration of Naught is usually a bit of a dick move, but in the case of Narset (and other hated commanders), it could be one of your best options.

Narset quickly earned her bad reputation upon her release, and I think it will be a long time before that reputation can be repaired.  Taking out the extra turn spells from the Narset decks would be a huge first step, but it is something I just don’t see happening for most players.  What makes Narset a strong Commander is the same thing that makes you hate her.

Numot, the Devastator

A lot of players don’t like land destruction.  Revealing your Commander to be something that destroys lands is like slapping each person at the table in the face with a dueling glove.  Numot isn’t one of the best legends available for EDH, but the nature of the card can turn a table before the game even begins.

Numot is easy to deal with.  Just kill him.  It’s so easy.  Just place the point of yourDoom Blade against his unarmored throat.  Holding it firmly, trace a curved line to give him a beautiful neck smile.

This dragon really isn’t that bad, but his reputation depends on a group’s level of acceptance for land destruction.  If you can convince everyone it’s not that bad, then he’s fine.  If everyone is dead set on hating the land destruction, then Numot will be forever hated.

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Sultai

The Mimeoplasm

The Mimeoplasm joins an elite group of legends that can easily kill a player with a single swing.  The ooze does it in a variety of ways, most popularly by making himself Skithiryx, the Blight Dragon and adding counters.  The speed at which the ooze can be cast and a player knocked out of the game is frightening.  It forces you to pay attention to The Mimeoplasm player at all times during a game.  While some people enjoy games that feel like that kind of tight rope walk, more players want to enjoy relaxed, casual games that don’t have them knocked out turn five every time.

Dealing with the Mimeoplasm just means bringing ways to deal with the graveyard, which everyone should be doing anyway.  Without the graveyard, the games become absolutely fair.  Having answers for people using their graveyard is a running theme among the hated generals, and that makes me wonder if enough players bring the proper level of graveyard hate at all.  On average, I recommend 4-7 cards in your deck that deal with threats in the ‘yard.  More if your meta is heavily graveyard-dependent, or if you can’t search out those answers.

The hate for The Mimeoplasm is of no fault of the ooze.  It is 100% groups not having answers for the graveyard.  The more people build their decks to deal with once-dead threats, the more likely The Mimeoplasm will stop being so hated.

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Azorious

Bruna, Light of Alabaster

People hate cheaters. I think the only thing that makes people hate cheaters more is when those same cheaters have been going around for years being all high-and-might, holier-than-though, and giving off that air of, “Rules are rules for a reason.” When an Azorious legend, who is supposed to represent law and order, starts cheating things onto the battlefield and breaking the rules of magic by letting you both steal auras from other players and move auras around from creature to creature, it feels like a betrayal. It’s an angel that cheats. Shame on you Bruna! From a gameplay perspective, Bruna combines two very potent strategies, recursion and commander damage. It’s fairly easy to get to 21 commander damage by attaching Battle Mastery and Eldrazi Conscription. There are so many good auras that make Bruna an immediate threat. If you aren’t packing graveyard hate, she can just keep getting them back. She also happens to be in the same colors as Sovereigns of Lost Alara. That means you can get auras from the battlefield, your hand, the graveyard, and the deck.

When we think about dealing with Bruna, we get back to our consistent advice throughout this article. You need graveyard hate, removal that exiles, and instant speed creature removal. Bruna is mana intensive, which means sending her back to the command zone a few times makes her too hard to cast to be worth it. You still need to deal with the graveyard, because cards like Open the Vaults and Replenish are nearly universal in her decks and will turn another creature into a mini-Bruna.

Since Blue-White aggro is not a typical strategy for a deck, I think the hate for Bruna is a bit unwarranted. It really stems from it being unusually easy to build a consistent and powerful deck. Most deck builders will be able to string together a deck that comes across as a big threat to their meta game. As long as you adjust to be on par with your local group, she is perfectly fine as a leader. If she is too powerful consider cutting the mass land destruction, ease up a little on the control aspects, and take out Eldrazi Conscription. If you are still finding it is too much for the group, try removing all the tutors and just find auras through card draw and random chance.

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Grand Arbiter Augustin IV

There are two universal truths in life, death and taxes. A lot of arguments stem from people thinking others aren’t paying their fair share. GAAIV is the MTG embodiment of people who game the system and somehow get benefits while everyone else pays the price. There is no quicker way to make enemies than telling everyone that they must pay more, but you will be getting discounts. Unlike other legends on this list, which are hated because of how they can be abused with other cards, GAAIV invokes a guttural, primal hatred based entirely on the card by itself. Of course it doesn’t help that these decks usually include things like Propogranda, Rhystic Study, and Winter Orb. GAAIV wins by crushing your spirit through the time-honored art of making you pay for everything. People use games as a way to relax and escape from the pressures of everyday life, GAAIV brings those pressures right back into Commander.

Combating a GAAIV deck is incredibly difficult and takes either teamwork or creativity. If you use your removal to remove the tax effects, you are effectively taxing yourself by spending removal on a non-threat. This works in GAAIV’s favor, since they are generally decks that rely on combo finishes. Once you are in a position where you either have no mana available or have spent all your removal, they can safely finish the game. If you spread the weight of this removal around between players, and work together against GAAIV as an archenemy, you can combat all the advantage by weight of numbers. This takes a great deal of social politics that I personally find difficult to pull off.

The other way to combat GAAIV is to avoid casting spells or attacking and get value through alternative means. This can be achieved by setting up engines for repeated removal by using cards such as Sun Titan or Salvaging Station paired with Executioner’s Capsule or Dispeller’s Capsule. In a similar fashion, you could use Mikaeus, The Unhallowed, Lifeline, or Sherei, Shizo’s Caretaker to get value out of your creatures enter-the-battlefield effects. Sneak Attack and Arcum Daggson can put permanents into play without casting spells; that may help bypass the additional costs. If the taxes don’t affect you, GAAIV hurts itself by wasting resources on restrictions that have no effect.

Unless you were to use GAAIV as an odd tribal deck, I don’t see a way to improve the reputation. Even if you avoided all the other taxing involved, it still doesn’t make up for the instinctive response to GAAIV. Outside cutthroat EDH groups, this may be one legend who the Social Contract pushes out of the format.

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Hanna, Ship’s Navigator

The hatred for Hannah has very little to do with Hannah herself.  She helped save the multi-verse after all.  As a card, she has been reprinted in the latest Commander products with awesome new art.  She is fair, her ability costs mana, and she only returns items to hand.  It’s a tap ability so it takes a turn for her to go online.  All of that should prevent her from being the subject of hate and ridicule, right?  Maybe if Mindslaver had never been printed that would be true.

The hatred of this card has history.  When the hate began, Commander was still EDH. This was before any reprints.  As an old border legend the few players that used Hannah were players with deep experience in Magic and larger collections. As a legend who worked well with both artifacts and enchantments in UW, the decks were known for being consist through recursion and access to great tutors. Deck builders discovered interesting locks that could be accomplished with Hannah by pairing her with cards like Aura of Silence and Decree of Silence. Hannah allowed players to use lock-down orbs such as Winter Orb and Static Orb that they would sacrifice at the end of the last opponents turn and then return to hand. This made the locks one-sided. It was a deck that used many older cards and put on the impression that cards printed before Commander was a format were overpowered because they hadn’t taken multiplayer or Commander into account.  The hate mostly came from players who hadn’t seen many of the cards being used, and were unsure of how to combat them.

Combating Hannah is very easy and removal of any kind or graveyard hate will shut her down. Combating the deck may be an issue since many builds don’t rely on her, and just use her utility. In that case, pack Bane of Progress, Aura Shards, or Shatter Strom alongside your graveyard hate since it is a basic artifact/enchantment combo deck.

With the reprint of Hannah and new players giving her a try, I see the hate dying down. She isn’t nearly as powerful as other cards on this list. If you are building her and want to avoid being hated, just keep Mindslaver and Decree of Silence out of the deck and you should be fine.

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Selysnya

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Simic

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Izzet

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Gruul

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Golgari

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Rakdos

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White

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Blue

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Black

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Red

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Again, I need your help. So head to to the comments or Tweet at me @SwordstoPlow answering any of these three questions:

  1. Who is missing and why?
  2. Which Commanders to you agree or disagree with, and why?
  3. How would you use one or more in an innovative or fun way to counteract their bad reputation?

I’ll work any feedback for the next part, but it may be a while. Real Life incoming.
Thanks!